What is Your Unique Selling Proposition?

Sales Pro Source
October 23, 2012 — 935 views  
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What is Your Unique Selling Proposition?

Your unique selling proposition is essentially your “thirty second commercial,” it’s your definitive statement to customers about why they should buy from you and it is easily the most important part of your entire sales pitch. However, it’s never just about declaring everything about your company that you think your customer wants to know. It’s not about inundating them with information and it’s never about using your selling proposition to force a customer to make a decision. Instead, it’s about defining your company’s value in a way that outlines the strengths of your company’s product and services. So how should you define your unique selling proposition?

Your Company’s Value

When salespeople need to define their unique selling proposition they often start by outlining their company’s value chain. A value chain analysis is a tool where companies define their business strengths in terms of how they manage their vendors, their internal operations, their engineering and design expertise, their product offering and finally, their aftersales support. You must understand your company’s value chain in order to define your unique selling proposition. After all, your customers want to be as confident in your company as they are in you as a salesperson.

Your customers need to appreciate the value that your company brings to the market. They have to be able to distinguish both your company’s product and service offering. The focus isn’t to define each portion of your company’s value chain. Instead, it’s to use your company’s value chain to ask important and pertinent questions, ones that help your customer understand the value of dealing with you and your company and ones that allow you to deliver your unique selling proposition.

Your Unique Selling Proposition

If your company operates in an industry where me-too product lines are the norm, then focus on defining your company’s customer service and aftersales product support. If your company has a product with excellent quality and longer life, then focus your unique selling proposition on your product’s features and benefits and how its longer life saves money. If you operate in a market where service is just as important as the product itself, then outline how your service differs from your competitors’. However, none of this is possible if you haven’t first defined your company’s value with a value chain analysis. 

Sales success isn’t about forcing a customer to buy a product or service. It isn’t about using strong-arm tactics and it is never about regurgitating information at nauseam. Sales success is ultimately about you understanding the value your company brings to the market, the value you bring to your customers and how both can help your customer in the long-term.

 

Sales Pro Source